Category Archives: Public Relations

Confessions of an Oversharer

I recently had someone delete me because I “overshare” information on Twitter.  It got me thinking about the issue.

As an “information junkie” who gets paid to research breaking news for my company and our clients, I come across a great deal of information that I feel is interesting.  I sometimes find it difficult to weed out my own interests and that of the audience involved.

My question is: “How often should I be posting messages onto these sites? Daily? Twice a day? Hourly?” Unfortunately, many people (myself included) post too often and abuse the airways. They send too many messages, which has two very negative effects.

First, you become an interruption rather than a welcome interlude. People who are following you and have your messages forwarded to their cell phone are constantly being interrupted by you. Now you’re a nuisance.  According to Pam Lontos, president of PR/PR, a public relations firm based in Orlando, Florida and  author of I See Your Name Everywhere. “The other problem is that search engines are designed to ignore these 140 character messages.”

However, there are strategic ways around that rule so that your 140 character messages become the alerts. The problem is that the search engines only allow a certain number of alerts per source, and it varies per search engine. If the search engines see too many messages coming from you during their standard interval period, they could flag you as a search engine spammer and lock you out.

So the best posting interval right now, in Pam’s opinion, is posting something every 48 hours, as that’s how long typically it takes for a message to be reported through search engines.

I will probably continue to post information I think is valuable but I will be more careful. What do you think?

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Examples of Social Media Policies

According to a recent article on social media by the blogger HrBartender /Sharlyn Lauby , there are generally two approaches to social media policy making. Some organizations handle social media in an evolutionary way. Chad Houghton, the director of e-media and business development at the Society for Human Resource Management, told me that he thinks, “it might be beneficial not to create some arbitrary rules without first seeing where the opportunities and risks really are.”

Other organizations, meanwhile, feel more comfortable establishing a clear policy from the outset. IBM, for example, has published their social media guidelines publicly for anyone to read. It’s a great policy, though rather long.

One thing is certain — clients are asking for where to find examples of current policies used by all  types of organizations. I was really excited when I came upon the best site I  have found so far the : Online Data Base for Social Media put together by Chris Boudreaux.  Chris has organized a pretty comprehensive social media policy database. The database currently has 106 policies with the policies being sorted by industry, organization and title. More are being added daily.

Among the companies whose social media policies are available on the site are About.com, the BBC, Dell, Dow Jones, Gartner, Microsoft, the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Air Force, Wal-Mart and Yahoo!

So if your organization is fretting about social media and you want to get them into the modern age, show them this site.  And if your company already has a social media policy and wants to show it to the world, it can submit that policy for inclusion in the Social Media Governance database.

Does your company have a policy? If so please share.:)

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I stalked Chris Brogan:)

T-shirtThis is an image off of a t-shirt my husband John bought me as a joke from Despair.com. I thought it was pretty funny.  It captures  brilliantly the three behavioral disorders propelling the continued phenomenal growth of today’s most widely-trafficked social media sites. And the personality dysfunctional forces of Narcissism, ADHD, and Stalking  that reside today’s in the fast growing area of social media.

As a social media practitioner I freely admitted to the ADHD, (not a bad trait for a multi-tasker). Narcisissim not so much, but I must admit I do like it when my posts are re-tweeted. ( I call it being informative.) But I didn’t get the Stalking category.

I do Now. I am a big fan of Chris Brogan and read his blog eagerly every morning as I drink  my coffee. When I heard that his book “Trust Agents” needed a launch push and he offered to be a speaker for anyone willing to buy 200 books. I jumped at the chance.  I pulled out my credit card and bam, I had 200 books.

Then the shock set in. How was I going to move 200 books? Well the Nashville tech community came to the rescue.  Lynn Bennett at Stage Post Studios offered to host the event. Social Media Club of Nashville (who JTMarCom is donating some of the proceeds to) has helped promote the event with Jessica Murray and Georgia Cross of SMCNash helping any way they can. And most of all, Chris Brogan and his great mother Diane Brogan have helped pull this all together.

Below is our press release: Three days and counting. I am nervous and excited. We could not have done this without many fine people involved.

It’s not too late to sign up HERE for the live portion of the event and if you live elsewhere please tune in HERE to the  Free Video Web Cast provided by Author’s Way.

RELEASE

In their new New York Times best-selling book, “Trust Agents” co-authors Chris Brogan and Julien Smith make the case that the Internet has made it easier than ever to reach your customers.  It’s less likely, however, that they’ll listen.  Today, the most valuable online currency isn’t the dollar, but trust itself.

In the video streaming webinar, Brogan will discuss how social networks and personal connections have far more influence on consumers than a company’s marketing messages ever well –unless your business knows how to harness them.  He will provide valuable insights on how to tap into the power of these networks to build your brand’s influence, reputation, and profits.

Brogan contends that trust agents aren’t necessarily marketers or salespeople; they’re digitally savvy people who use the Web to humanize businesses using transparency, honesty, and genuine relationships.  As a result, they wield enough online influence to build up or bring down a business’s reputation.

During the first two hours of the webinar (10 a.m. to 12 noon EST), Brogan will discuss how to build profitable relationships with trust agents and his six basic principles for becoming a trust agent yourself.

During the final hour of the webinar (12 noon to 1 p.m. EST), audience members will have the opportunity to pose questions to Brogan  via phone, Twitter and email.  He will respond to as many questions time permitting and will sign books for these individuals.  Brogan’s book and a DVD of the webinar will also be available for purchase to all audience members through Authorsway.com.

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Seven steps to turn around a disgruntled client

If you have a disgruntled client, (and we all have!) one who has had a bad experience, what can you do to turn things around? The seven simple steps listed below that can help you turn an unhappy customer into your biggest fan.

Step One:

Empathetic apology. It isn’t sufficient to mumble the word “sorry” and expect it to have a positive effect. Your apology needs to show your customer that you understand how your mistake has negatively impacted his or her life.

Step Two:

Take ownership. You want the customer to understand that you are the person who will fix their problem. Ask the customer what you can do to “make it right”.

Step Three:

If possible fix the problem immediately. Sometimes you can’t fix the problem immediately, in which case you need to show the customer that you’re making a sincere effort to resolve the problem.

Step Four:

Get your customer’s buy in. Asking for the customer’s agreement will ensure that he will be satisfied. With small problems, these four steps should satisfy your customer. But remember — a satisfied customer doesn’t talk about his experience. Now, take the opportunity to add value, so that your customers will talk about how great you are. To do this, you need to take two additional steps.

Step Five:

Atonement. You need to go the extra mile to show that you are truly sorry. A small token can go a long way to ease the pain your mistake caused. Send them a hand written note.

Step Six:

Follow up. This is where you can really shine. After a short period of time, call, e-mail or write your customer and make sure they are satisfied with your efforts. This is also an opportunity to ask for more business and referrals.

Step Seven:

None of the above will work if you are NOT sincerely sorry!

None of these steps take an inordinate amount of time or money, but they can really create delighted customers — customers who will tell stories that promote you to their friends and family.

Source: Pamela Webb, Promotional Consultants Today and Laurie Brown is an international speaker, trainer and consultant who works to help people improve their sales, service and presentation skills. She is the author of The Teleprompter Manual for Executives, Politicians, Broadcasters and Speakers.

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100 Terrific Twitter Feeds for Young Entrepreneurs

http://www.selectcourses.com/

Twitter is an excellent resource for learning, especially those who are building a business. You can learn about marketing, news, and more, and see what other successful young entrepreneurs are up to. Check out this list to find 100 feeds young entrepreneurs should watch on Twitter.

Groups

These groups on Twitter cater to young entrepreneurs.

  1. Mediabistro: Mediabistro is a great community for news, opportunities, and more for media professionals.
  2. @yeos: If you’re a young entrepreneur in Sweden, be sure to follow @yeos to learn about networking, inspiration, and idea exchanging.
  3. @texasventures: Texas Ventures is an entrepreneur network and student organization for Texans.
  4. #yep: Tweeters taking part in #yep are young entrepreneurs and professionals on Twitter.
  5. the_pitch: You can learn a good deal about pitching from this contest for entrepreneurs.
  6. @thestartupeu: @thestartupeu represents a group that supports startups, entrepreneurship, venture capital, and more.

News & Advice

Follow these Twitter feeds to find news, advice, and more.

  1. @EntMagazineAmy: Amy Cosper is the editor in chief of Entrepreneur Magazine.
  2. @guykawasaki: Check out Guy Kawasaki for news in business and more.
  3. @digg_frontpage: Find out what’s on the Digg front page from this Twitter bot.
  4. @smallbusiness: Follow @smallbusiness to get updates on small business news.
  5. @entrepreneurpro: Follow Ben Lang’s Twitter to learn about teen entrepreneurs.
  6. @JohnChow: John Chow is a great person to follow if you’re interested in learning how to make money blogging.
  7. @WebWorkerDaily: Follow WebWorkerDaily, and you’ll learn about better using the web for work.
  8. @ginatrapani: Gina Trapani is the founder of Lifehacker, and guru of all things productivity.
  9. @JasonCalacanis: Jason Calacanis shares news and more about social media, blogs, and online entrepreneurship.
  10. @StartupGuru: Brian Tsuchiya’s feed is full of useful startup news links.
  11. @IncMagazine: Follow @IncMagazine, a magazine for entrepreneurs.
  12. @College_Mogul: @College_Mogul reports on startups, entrepreneurship, innovation, and technology.
  13. @EntMagazine: Follow Entrepreneur Magazine on Twitter here.
  14. @barefoot_exec: Carrie Wilkerson aims to educate, empower and encourage entrepreneurs young and old.
  15. @wiredmag: Get the official news feed of Wired magazine here, especially useful if you’re a young entrepreneur into technology.
  16. @onstartups: Read about startups from the founder and CTO of HubSpot.
  17. @teenbizcoach: Check out Shonika Proctor’s feed to learn how to use your talents for business.

Marketing

If you’re interested in learning how to better market and brand your business, be sure to check out these Twitter feeds.

  1. @zappos: Follow @zappos to learn a thing or a thousand about good customer service and marketing.
  2. @missrogue: Tara Hunt is a great person to follow if you’d like to learn about marketing that works.
  3. @mashable: @mashable will help you make sense of the social web.
  4. @chrisbrogan: Chris Brogan is the president of New Marketing Labs, a social media agency and education company.
  5. @adbroad: Helen Klein Ross shares information about social media and more.
  6. @WillieCrawford: Willie Crawford is an excellent resource for learning about Internet marketing.
  7. @eMarketing_Tips: Get tips for emarketing, social media, and more from @eMarketing_Tips.
  8. @problogger: Follow Darren Rowse to learn how you can more effectively use your blog as an entrepreneur.
  9. @nichelady: On @nichelady’s feed, you’ll learn how to make payday come every day.
  10. @smmguide: Social Media Guide shares information about social media marketing.
  11. @darrenmonroe: Darren Monroe shares lots of tweets about leadership and web marketing.
  12. @marketingwizdom: Follow Robert Clay to learn about low risk/high return marketing strategies.
  13. @adhustler: @adhustler is all about affiliate marketing.
  14. @wbaustin: Bill Austin shares news from Internet marketing and beyond.
  15. @oudiantebi: Oudi Antebi is a social marketing expert and entrepreneur.
  16. @MrSocial: Mr. Social is a marketing guru and social media expert.
  17. @ScottAllen: Scott is an expert in social media, and loves to help entrepreneurs.
  18. @TYSONtheQUICK: Tyson is a marketing student and COO of Meisab Labs.
  19. @Debbas: Check out Debbas to learn about promotional items and printing from a professor of marketing.
  20. @brianadrian: Read Brian Adrian’s tweets to learn about social media and web 2.0 marketing.
  21. @DiyanaAlcheva: Diyana is a marketing specialist and Internet network marketing business coach.
  22. @danschawbel: Dan Schawbel of Personal Branding Blog will help you brand yourself and your business.
  23. @BrandKarma: Check out @BrandKarma to learn about branding for your business.

Coaches

Follow these business and life coaches who can help you get a better handle on what you’re doing.

  1. @sacca: Christ Sacca offers advisement to startups.
  2. @mariaandeos: Check out Maria Anros to learn how to attract a following and new clients.
  3. @socrates_soc: Socrates is an Internet marketing expert and coach.
  4. @MariSmith: Mari Smith is a friendly social media trainer that loves to help others grow their business.
  5. @RonDavies: Follow Ron Davies to get coached in making the most of Twitter.
  6. @AndrewWindham: Andrew Windham is a professional speaker, entrepreneurial and business coach, and more.
  7. @GabeStrom: GabeStrom is a coach inspired to help you reach your full potential.
  8. @Rob_Moshe: Rob Moshe is a life success coach that can help you with attraction marketing.

Entrepreneurs

Get inspiration, ideas, and more from these entrepreneurs on Twitter.

  1. @randfish: Rand Fishkin is the CEO of SEOmoz, a search optimization and Internet marketing firm.
  2. @richardbranson: Chairman of Virgin Group, Richard Branson is one of the most recognizable and successful entrepreneurs on Twitter.
  3. @boutiquegirl: Maiken Jepsen is a work at home mom, designer, and the owner of a boutique clothing shop.
  4. @RobMcNealy: Rob McNealy is full of inspiration for new entrepreneurs.
  5. @tferriss: Tim Ferriss is the author of #1 NY Times bestseller The 4-Hour Workweek.
  6. @kevinrose: This founder of Digg is full of random ideas.
  7. @r27: Rajesh Pancholi owns and operates the creative UK studio known as R27 Creativelab.
  8. @TEDchris: Chris Anderson and his organization share ideas worth spreading.
  9. @tonyrobbins: Get inspired by @tonyrobbins.
  10. @teenceo: Patricio Quezarda shares the details of being an emerging teen CEO and digital media mogul.
  11. @StaceyMonk: Stacey Monk is an entrepreneur and dogooder.
  12. @calbucci: Marcelo Calbucci is the founder and CTO of Sampa.
  13. @IncSpring: Wes Wilson’s IncSpring is a social marketplace for entrepreneurs.
  14. @stanleytang: @stanleytang is a 16 year old internet entrepreneur and best-selling author.
  15. @davesnyder: Check out Dave Snyder to learn about search and social media marketing.
  16. @sumaya: @Sumaya is a founder of The Cultural Connect, and has been recognized by Business Week as a top young entrepreneur.
  17. @nlw: Nathaniel Whitmore is the founder of Assetmap.org and a founding organizer of Change.org.
  18. Jeremy Schooley: Jeremy Schooley is the COO at Digital Labz.
  19. @gotmelik: Melik Yuksel is a 14 year old blogger, web and graphic designer, and entrepreneur.
  20. @sundaycosmetics: Beverly Davis is the entrepreneur behind Sunday Cosmetics.
  21. @rseanlindsay: Sean Lindsay wears the hats of entrepreneur, creator, connector, technologist, and builder.
  22. @darbydarnit: Petri Darby is the “Chief Darn Officer.”
  23. Joann Sondy: Joann is a seasoned entrepreneur and owner of Creative Aces.
  24. @netgeek06: Thomson Chemmanoor is the founder of Digital Labz.
  25. @chrispund: Chris Pund writes a blog for young entrepreneurs and even manages two web-based companies of his own.
  26. @RickM: Rick Myers is the founder and CEO of Talent Zoo.

Finance & Venture Capital

These Twitter feeds will teach you about economics and funding.

  1. @freakonomics: Get more of the goodness found in the Freakonomics blog from @freakonomics.
  2. @mintdotcom: Learn about finance, money tips, and more from Mint.
  3. @turbotax: Check out Turbo Tax to get the tax help every young entrepreneur needs.
  4. @planetmoney: @planetmoney will help you get a handle on the global economy.
  5. @vctips: Get a look into the minds of venture capitalists from @vctips.

Blogs & Writers

Check out these Twitter feeds to find excellent advice from bloggers and writers concerned with young entrepreneurs.

  1. @YoungGoGetter: @YoungGoGetter will keep you up to date on the latest for young entrepreneurs.
  2. @Retireat21: This blogger is all about helping young entrepreneurs make money online.
  3. @TPEntrepreneur: The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur will help you go from aspiring young entrepreneur to industry leader.
  4. @socialentrprnr: If you’re an entrepreneur focused on social change, be sure to check out @socialentrprnr.
  5. @yarostarak: Yaro is a professional blogger full of advice for bloggers and Internet marketers.
  6. @garyvee: Check out @garyvee to see how social media can improve your business.
  7. @shoemoney: Jeremy Schoemaker is a blogger that can help you learn how to make money with your blog.
  8. @Gladwell: Malcolm Gladwell’s Twitter will have you always thinking about success.
  9. @venturehacks: @venturehacks aims to be a business school for entrepreneurs.
  10. @MattWilsontv: Matt Wilson supports entrepreneurs under 30.
  11. @doshdosh: @doshdosh is a great resource for Internet marketing and making money online.
  12. @copyblogger: Brian Clark will teach you about new media content.
  13. @thebizguy: Find tweets from Adam, a cofounder of YoungEntrepreneur.com on @thebizguy.
  14. @penelopetrunk: Follow Penelope to learn about the intersection of work and life.
  15. @ramit: Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You to Be Rich and PBWiki is a goldmine of knowledge for young
  16. entrepreneurshttp://www.selectcourses.com/blog/2009/100-terrific-twitter-feeds-for-young-entrepreneurs/

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